Hubble Catches New Stars, Individually, Form…

Hubble Catches New Stars, Individually, Forming In Galaxies Beyond The Milky Way

“There are a massive variety of star-forming regions nearby, and Hubble’s new Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is now the sharpest, most comprehensive one ever. 

By imaging 50 nearby, star-forming spiral and dwarf galaxies, astronomers can see how the galactic environment affects star-formation.”

Within galaxies, new stars are going to be formed from the existing population of gas. But how that gas collapses and forms stars, as well as the types, numbers, and locations of the stars that will arise, is highly dependent on the galactic environment into which they are born. Dwarf galaxies, for example, tend to form stars when a nearby gravitational interaction triggers them. These bursts occur periodically, leading to multiple populations of stars of different ages. Spirals, on the other hand, form their new stars mostly along the lines traced by their arms, where the dust and gas is densest. Thanks to the Hubble Space Telescope, we’re capable of finding these stars and resolving them individually, using a combination of optical and ultraviolet data.

The best part? These are individually resolved stars from well outside our own galaxy: in 50 independent ones. Here’s what Hubble’s new LEGUS survey is revealing.

Ask Ethan: Will Future Civilizations Miss The …

Ask Ethan: Will Future Civilizations Miss The Big Bang?

“If intelligent life re-emerges in our solar system in a few billion years, only a few points of light will still be visible in the sky. What kind of theory of the universe will those beings concoct? It is almost certain to be wrong. Why do we think that what we can view now can lead us to a “correct” theory when a few billion years before us, things might have looked completely different?”

Incredibly, the Universe we know and love today won’t be the way it is forever. If we were born in the far future, perhaps a hundred billion years from now, we wouldn’t have another galaxy to look at for a billion light years: hundreds of times more distant than the closest galaxies today. Our local group will merge into a single, giant elliptical galaxy, and there will be no sign at all of young stars, of star-forming regions, of other galaxies, or even of the Big Bang’s leftover glow. If we were born in the far future, we might miss the Big Bang as the correct origin of our Universe. It makes one wonder, when you think about it in those terms, if we’re missing something essential about our Universe today? In the 13.8 billion years that have passed, could we already have lost some essential information about the history of our Universe?

And in the far future, might we see something that, as of right now, hasn’t yet grown to prominence? Let’s explore this and see what you think!

The best free response answer of the year goes…

The best free response answer of the year goes to this kid

How Scientific Publishers Can End Bullying And…

How Scientific Publishers Can End Bullying And Harassment In The Sciences

“We cannot rely on individual departments or colleges/universities to protect the victims of academic bullying or harassment. Decades of inaction and inadequate action have shown that senior faculty members will continue to engage in unacceptable behavior unless there are real consequences that threaten to take their power away. Their academic careers, however, are based in their ability to successfully publish their work and results in prestigious and meritorious journals, and therefore it is truly the publishers who hold the power to police their actions. If we are serious about solving our bullying and harassment problems, and making scientific research opportunities truly the open and merit-based game we idealize them to be, we can take this next great step. We can not only condemn, but forbid, the unacceptable behavior that continues to cost our fields so many of our best and brightest minds.”

A great number of promising scientific careers have been derailed not based on the scientific merits of the young researcher in question, but rooted in the harassment and bullying they’ve had to endure. When a senior, more powerful professional makes the choice to bully or harass a junior individual, there is usually little recourse the victim can take. Filing a complaint usually harms the victim’s career more than the perpetrator. Despite the existence of Title IX, the policies of colleges and universities are mostly toothless, and designed to protect the institution, not the victim. But if they wanted to, scientific publishers could change the game immediately. By placing a ban on who is allowed to author papers based on violations of their codes of ethics/conduct, they could essentially punish the perpetrators in the one way they’d actually care about the most: in a way that harms their scientific legacy.

Take a look at a new proposal to end bullying and harassment in the sciences. I am sure it’s not perfect, but it’s the most revolutionary step towards protecting people of all genders, colors, and religions from bullying, harassment, and abuse ever seriously considered.

Astronomers Confirm Second Most-Distant Galaxy…

Astronomers Confirm Second Most-Distant Galaxy Ever, And Its Stars Are Already Old

“Scientists have just confirmed the second most distant galaxy of all: MACS1149-JD1, whose light comes from when the Universe was 530 million years old: less than 4% of its present age. But what’s remarkable is that we’ve been able to detect oxygen in there, marking the first time we’ve seen this heavy element so far back. From the observations we’ve made, we can conclude this galaxy is at least 250 million years old, pushing the direct evidence for the first stars back further than ever.”

When it comes to the most distant galaxies of all, our current set of cutting-edge telescopes simply won’t get us there. The end of the cosmic dark ages and the dawn of the first cosmic starlight is a mystery that will remain until at least 2020: when the James Webb Space Telescope launches. Using the power of a multitude of observatories, we’ve managed to find a gravitationally lensed galaxy whose light comes to us from over 13 billion years ago. But unlike previous galaxies discovered near that distance, we’ve detected oxygen in this one, allowing us to get a precise measurement and to estimate its age.

For the first time, we have evidence from galaxies, directly, that the Universe’s first stars formed no later than 250 million years after the Big Bang. Here’s how we know.

31, 39, 48 (physics) and….Congratulations! …

31, 39, 48 (physics) and….Congratulations! 🌸

Thank you!

31. Math pick up line
Hey girl do you want me to make a Fourier analysis? Cause you’re sending me complex signals

39. Last time you computed something without a calculator
i do that often to check if my Mathematica code works correctly

48. Has math changed you?
I like to think it has made me a more logical person, but i can’t prove that

(hoping you meant the math ask)

Congrats

Congrats

Thanks! ♦️

Aliens In The Multiverse? Here’s Why Dar…

Aliens In The Multiverse? Here’s Why Dark Energy Doesn’t Tell You Anything

“It’s important to recognize that there are a wide variety of possible values that dark energy could have, including significantly larger values, that would still lead to a Universe very much like our own. Until we understand where these values come from, and what makes one set of values more likely than another, it’s grossly unfair to claim that we won the cosmic lottery in having a Universe with the values ours possesses. Unless you know the rules that govern the game you’re playing, you have no idea how likely or unlikely the one result you see actually was.”

There are a series of interesting results that have just emerged from the EAGLE collaboration, which has been simulating the Universe to learn what types of stars and galaxies form within it. They varied the value of dark energy in it tremendously, and found that even if you increased the amount by five, ten, or fifty times as much, you’d still form plenty of stars and galaxies: enough to give you chances at life like we have here. This surprised them, since they assumed the value of dark energy we have is finely-tuned to allow life. But it appears that things may not be as finely-tuned as we had thought! The simulation results are interesting, but this doesn’t really tell you anything about aliens in the Multiverse, since we have no idea what causes dark energy to have the values that it does.

Until we know the rules that govern this, we can’t really say what dark energy tells us about aliens in Universes other than our own. Here’s why.

Regular

physicsforbunnies:

GOT ACCEPTED IN A DREAM PHD PROGRAM I can’t control myself

Thank you all very much guys. I’ll make a post about the project soon cause it’s really interesting

Congrats on your acceptance!!! 🎈

Congrats on your acceptance!!! 🎈

Thanks! 🎆