“If you place a small droplet atop a vibrating pool, it will…

“If you place a small droplet atop a vibrating pool, it will happily bounce like a kid on a trampoline”. And when lots of these droplets are placed in a lattice, their behavior as a collective is absolutely fascinating.

In this series of gifs, you can see the evolution of complex lattices from simple droplets eventually leading to an instability that drives them apart.

Now a key thing to note is that when you have 7 droplets, you will not obtain a hexagonal lattice configuration per se. Those lattices had to be obtained artificially but can be very stable after they are formed.

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Source: Archimedean lattices in the bound states of wave interacting particles

The key point of distinction when one talks about lattice in this vernacular is that in solid state physics, a crystal lattice is the depiction of three-dimensional solid as points.

And one obtains these crystalline solids through crystallization.

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In contrast, when we are talking about lattices in pilot wave hydrodynamics, they are formed by the standing waves of the bouncing droplets.

In the upcoming posts, we will take a dive into some quantum mechanical experiments and their pilot wave hydrodynamic counterparts.

In case you had missed out, here are the previous posts on this collaborative series on Pilot wave Hydrodynamics with FYFD : 1) Introduction; 2) Chladni patterns; 3) Faraday instability, 4) Bouncing droplets