Ask Ethan: What’s So ‘Anti’ …

Ask Ethan: What’s So ‘Anti’ About Antimatter?

“On a fundamental level, what is the difference between matter and its counterpart antimatter? Is there some sort of intrinsic property that causes a particle to be matter or antimatter? Is there some intrinsic property (like spin) that distinguishes quarks and antiquarks? What what puts the ‘anti’ in anti matter?”

Every particle that exists has an antiparticle counterpart, with some particles behaving as their own antiparticles. Every time a particle collides with its antiparticle, it can annihilate away into pure energy; every time two particles collide with enough free energy, they can create particle/antiparticle pairs. But the key is that there are a whole slew of quantum numbers that must be conserved, and conserving energy is just the start of the story. Not every particle is matter; not every antiparticle is antimatter. Only fermions can have that designation. In fact, every fermion is a matter particle, and every anti-fermion is an antimatter particle, while the bosons, regardless of their other properties, are neither matter nor antimatter. Why is that? Because there are only two quantum numbers that are relevant to the question of whether you’re matter or not: baryon number and lepton number.

How do these come together to put the “matter” in normal matter, and the “anti” in antimatter? Find out on this edition of Ask Ethan!