Five Years After The Higgs, What Else Has The …

Five Years After The Higgs, What Else Has The LHC Found?

“There is every reason to be optimistic, since the LHC will produce tons of b-mesons and b-baryons, as well as more Higgs bosons than every other particle source combined. Sure, the biggest breakthrough we could hope for would be the detection of a brand new particle, and evidence for one of the great theoretical breakthroughs that have dominated particle physics in recent decades: supersymmetry, extra dimensions, technicolor, or grand unification. But even in the absence of that, there is plenty to learn, at a fundamental level, about how the Universe works. There are plenty of indicators that nature plays by rules we have not yet fully discovered, and that’s more than enough motivation to keep looking. We already have the machine, and the data will be on its way in unprecedented amounts very soon. Whatever new hints are hiding at the TeV scale will soon be within reach.”

There are lots of calls out there for the LHC to be the last great particle physics collider out there, as fears that there’s nothing new to discover at the energies we can create grip the community. After all, the great hope was that they would find new, unexpected particles at CERN, and that would guide the way forward in the field with experimental evidence. Well, we didn’t get as lucky as we could have, but there are plenty of reasons to be optimistic: there appears to be new physics in the b-quark sector; we’re entering the era of precision Higgs measurements; and the total amount of data we’ve obtained at the LHC is just 1/50th of the total amount we’ll wind up with after Runs III, IV and V are complete. Just because the greatest victory we could have imagined didn’t come true doesn’t mean there isn’t an incredible amount left to learn from this remarkable machine.

Come see, five years on, what we have and haven’t found. The future of particle physics is bright even without made-up evidence for our favored hypotheses!