Pieces Of Mars Have Landed On Earth

Pieces Of Mars Have Landed On Earth

“All three of these types are notably different from all the other meteorites found on Earth, but have elemental and isotopic commonalities with one another. The ratio of their oxygen isotopes, in particular, were different from that of other meteorites, as well as having younger formation ages. For a long time, scientists suspected they might have a common origin to one another, distinct from the more typical meteorites.

In 1976, the Viking landers returned direct information about the Martian surface, including the Martian atmosphere and the rocks found on the ground. The similarities were striking, leading many to hypothesize that all three types originated from Mars. But the true “smoking gun” came in 1983, when a variety of trapped gases were found in glass formed by the impact of one such shergottite, and it matched the gases found by Viking on Mars.”

Many of us have witnessed meteor showers, bolides, or even randomly large bodies strike the atmosphere of Earth and leave a brilliant streak across the sky. Every once in a while, such a strike will result in an impact on Earth’s surface, leaving a meteorite behind. As of today, over 61,000 meteorites have been discovered, with most of them having huge commonalities of their physical and chemical properties. A few of them, however, are weirdos. They’re younger, they haven’t been in space for very long, and they’re made out of a different mix of materials from the others. For years, it was speculated that they came from Mars, and with the advent of robotic exploration of the surface, we’ve finally found the smoking gun evidence.

About 0.3% of all the meteorites on Earth have a Martian origin. There are pieces of Mars landing on Earth, and the Solar System is richer for it.