This Is How We Will Successfully Image A Black…

This Is How We Will Successfully Image A Black Hole’s Event Horizon

“Normally, the resolution of your telescope is determined by two factors: the diameter of your telescope and the wavelength of light you’re using to view it. The number of wavelengths of light that fit across your dish determines the optimal angular diameter you can resolve. Yet if this were truly our limits, we’d never see a black hole at all. You’d need a telescope the diameter of the Earth to view even the closest ones in the radio, where black holes emit the strongest and most reliably.

But the trick of very-long baseline interferometry is to view extremely bright sources, simultaneously, from identical telescopes separated by large distances. While they only have the light-gathering power of the surface area of the individual dishes, they can, if a source is bright enough, resolve objects with the resolution of the entire baseline. For the Event Horizon Telescope, that baseline is the diameter of the Earth.”

The Event Horizon Telescope is one of the best examples of international collaboration, and its necessity, in answering questions that are too big for any one nation to do alone. Part of the reason for that is geography: if you want to get the highest-resolution information possible about the Universe, you need the longest-baseline of simultaneous observations that it’s possible to make. That means, if you want to go as hi-res as possible, using the full diameter of the Earth. From the Americas to Eurasia to Africa, Australia and even Antarctica, radio astronomers are all working together to create the first image of a black hole’s event horizon.

What does it look like? Is General Relativity correct? As soon as the Event Horizon Telescope team releases their first images, we’ll know. Come watch a live-blog of a talk from their team today, and get the answers as soon as we know them!