How Much Of The Unobservable Universe Will We …

How Much Of The Unobservable Universe Will We Someday Be Able To See?

“You might think that if we waited for an arbitrarily long amount of time, we’d be able to see an arbitrarily far distance, and that there would be no limit to how much of the Universe would become visible.

But in a Universe with dark energy, that simply isn’t the case. As the Universe ages, the expansion rate doesn’t drop to lower and lower values, approaching zero. Instead, there remains a finite and important amount of energy intrinsic to the fabric of space itself. As time goes on in a Universe with dark energy, the more distant objects will appear to recede from our perspective faster and faster. Although there’s still more Universe out there to discover, there’s a limit to how much of it will ever become observable to us.”

The Universe is a huge, vast, enormous place. It’s been 13.8 billion years since the Big Bang occurred, which translates into an observable Universe that’s 46 billion light years to its edge, and contains some 2 trillion galaxies in various stages of evolutionary development. But that’s not the end of what we’ll ever be able to observe. As time goes on, light that’s presently on its way to our eyes will eventually catch up, revealing a future visibility limit that’s even larger than the present observable Universe. When we add it all up, we’ll find that we more than double the number of galaxies we can observe, even though we can barely reach 1% of them.

How does this all work? Find out the limits of the observable and unobservable Universe today!