Could The Milky Way Be More Massive Than Andro…

Could The Milky Way Be More Massive Than Andromeda?

“The Milky Way is home to the Sun, our Solar System, and hundreds of billions of stars beyond that. Yet unlike all the other galaxies out there — in our Local Group and in the Universe beyond — we have no good way to view our own galaxy from our position within it. As a result, the full extent of our galaxy, including its total size, mass, matter content, and number of stars, remains mysterious to modern astronomers.

We’ve long looked at the galaxies surrounding our local neighborhood in space and compared ourselves to them. Although there may be more than 60 galaxies present within the Local Group, two of them dominate in every way imaginable: ourselves and Andromeda. We are the two largest, most massive galaxies around, with more stars than all the others combined. But which one is bigger? Long thought to be Andromeda, we’re now finding out the Milky Way might have a chance at being number one.”

It’s 2019, and we still don’t know how massive the Milky Way is, or even whether we’re the most massive galaxy in the Local Group or not. It’s a lot like measuring your eye color: looking out at everyone else, it’s easy to see what color their eyes are. But if you didn’t have a reflection, photograph, or the observations of others, how would you know your own eye color? Well, being trapped within the Milky Way makes measurements notoriously difficult, and we’re only now figuring out how to overcome that obstacle.

It’s not only possible, but even likely that the Milky Way, despite having fewer stars occupying less volume than Andromeda’s, is the most massive galaxy in the Local Group. Come get the full story.