How Did This Black Hole Get So Big So Fast?

How Did This Black Hole Get So Big So Fast?

“Recently, a new black hole, J1342+0928, was discovered to originate from 13.1 billion years ago: when the Universe was 690 million years old, just 5% of its current age. It has a mass of 800 million Suns, an exceedingly high figure for such early times. Even if black holes formed from the very first stars, they’d have to accrete matter and grow at the maximum rate possible — the Eddington limit — to reach this size so rapidly. Fortunately, other methods may also grow a supermassive black hole.”

One of the puzzles of how our Universe grew up is how the supermassive black holes we find at the centers of galaxies got so big so fast. We’ve got multiple black holes that come from when the Universe was less than 10% of its current age that are already many hundreds of millions, if not billions, of solar masses in size. How did they get so big so fast? While many hypothesize exotic scenarios like our Universe being born with (primordial) black holes, there is no evidence for such an extraordinary leap. Could conventional astrophysics, and the realistic conditions of our early Universe, actually lead to black holes so massive so early on?

The answer is very likely yes. Come see an extremely favored scenario, with nothing more than conventional astrophysics, that just might get us there.