Category: cosmology

If Cosmology Is In Crisis, Then These Are The …

If Cosmology Is In Crisis, Then These Are The 19 Most Important Galaxies In The Universe

“In science, different methods of measuring the same properties should yield the same results. But when it comes to the expanding Universe, two sets of groups get consistently different outcomes. Signals from the early Universe yield expansion rates of 67 km/s/Mpc, while late-time signals yield systematically larger values. However, every individual measurement is subject to errors and uncertainties inherent to the method used.”

The strength of any method used in a scientific practice is only as good as the weakest assumption or measurement that’s made. In the case of measuring the expanding Universe, astronomers using an early-time signal get results that are systematically 9% smaller than astronomers using a late-time signal. Of all the late-time signals, the one method with the smallest uncertainties relies on the cosmic distance ladder: tying parallax measurements to Cepheids in the Milky Way, then tying Cepheids to galaxies with Type Ia supernovae, then measuring supernovae everywhere in the Universe. However, there are only 19 galaxies where Type Ia supernovae have been observed that are close enough to have observed Cepheids within them. A tiny statistical fluctuation in the properties of these galaxies could be enough to resolve most or even all of this discrepancy.

It may not be the most likely outcome, but it’s something to keep an eye on. If cosmology is in crisis, then these may be the 19 most important galaxies of all.

We Have Already Entered The Sixth And Final Er…

We Have Already Entered The Sixth And Final Era Of Our Universe

“In the end, only black dwarf stars and isolated masses to small to ignite nuclear fusion will remain, sparsely populated and disconnected from one another in this empty, ever-expanding cosmos. These final-state corpses will exist even googols of years onward, continuing to persist as dark energy remains the dominant factor in our Universe.

This last era, of dark energy domination, has already begun. Dark energy became important for the Universe’s expansion 6 billion years ago, and began dominating the Universe’s energy content around the time our Sun and Solar System were being born. The Universe may have six unique stages, but for the entirety of Earth’s history, we’ve already been in the final one. Take a good look at the Universe around us. It will never be this rich — or this easy to access — ever again.”

There are a whole slew of events and stages that the Universe has passed through over its cosmic history, and plenty of more to come as the future continues to unfold. But as far as eras of the Universe go, where things make hard transitions from one epoch to another, all of our cosmic history can be divided into six of them. From inflation to the primordial soup of the hot Big Bang to the plasma-rich early Universe to the cosmic dark ages to the stellar age to the dark energy era, our entire natural history fits nicely within these boxes.

The only existential problem? The entirety of Earth’s existence has occurred in this sixth and final era. We’re already in the end stages; see how far we’ve come and learn how far we’ll go!

Sorry, Black Holes Aren’t Actually Black

Sorry, Black Holes Aren’t Actually Black

“If you have an astrophysical object that emits radiation, that immediately defies the definition of black: where something is a perfect absorber while itself emitting zero radiation. If you’re emitting anything, you aren’t black, after all.

So it goes for black holes. The most perfectly black object in all the Universe isn’t truly black. Rather, it emits a combination of all the radiation from all the objects that ever fell into it (which will asymptote to, but never reach, zero) along with the ultra-low-temperature but always-present Hawking radiation.

You might have thought that black holes truly are black, but they aren’t. Along with the ideas that black holes suck everything into them and black holes will someday consume the Universe, they’re the three biggest myths about black holes. Now that you know, you’ll never get fooled again!”

So, you thought you knew all there way to know about black holes? That if you get enough mass together in a small enough volume of space, you create an event horizon: a region from within which nothing can escape, not even light. So how is it, then, that black holes wind up emitting radiation, even long after the last particle of matter to fall into them has ceased?

There are two ways this occurs, and both are completely unavoidable. Black holes aren’t actually black, and this is how we know it.

New Method For Tracing Dark Matter Reveals Its…

New Method For Tracing Dark Matter Reveals Its Location, Abundance As Never Before

“By measuring the distorted light from distant galaxies behind a galaxy cluster, scientists can reconstruct the total cluster mass. In every galaxy cluster, the majority of the mass is outside of the galaxies: there is a huge dark matter halo. The intracluster gas, however, may be distributed differently, as normal matter can collide and heat up, emitting X-rays. But individual stars, ejected from galaxies, should trace the same path as the dark matter. In a cosmic first, scientists measured this intracluster light, and found it traces out the dark matter perfectly.”

If you want to know where the dark matter is located in the Universe, you had to infer its presence and abundance by measuring the gravitational effects it had on space. When it comes to large-scale structures, like galaxy clusters, this often involved exceedingly difficult reconstructions involving gravitational lensing, and relied on serendipitous alignments of observable background structures. But a new study has concocted an alternative method that works extremely well: just measure the intracluster light from stars that have been ejected from the component galaxies.

Well, with the first two clusters down, we have a verdict: it’s the best dark matter-tracer of all time. Come get the remarkable story today!

This Is Why Every Galaxy Doesn’t Have Th…

This Is Why Every Galaxy Doesn’t Have The Same Amount Of Dark Matter

“It isn’t the properties of one or two galaxies that will be the ultimate test of dark matter, however. Whether these galaxies are generic dwarf galaxies or our first examples of dark matter-free galaxies isn’t the point; the point is that there are hundreds of billions of these dwarf galaxies out there that are presently below the limits of what’s observable, detectable, or having their properties measured. When we get there, especially in the distant Universe and in post-interaction environments, we can fully expect to truly find this yet-unconfirmed population of galaxies.

If dark matter is real, it must be separable from normal matter, and that works both ways. We’ve already found the dark matter-rich galaxies out there, as well as isolated intergalactic plasma. But dark matter-free galaxies? They might be right around the corner, and this is why everybody is so excited!”

When the Universe was first born, everything was uniform. There was dark matter and normal matter everywhere, in the same 5-to-1 ratio in all structures. But then the Universe had to go and get messy. It formed stars and galaxies of different masses and sizes, and that’s where the trouble started. In large, massive galaxies, even cataclysms like supernovae or active supermassive black holes don’t eject very much normal matter. But in small galaxies, significant amounts of normal matter can get ejected, upping that ratio to dozens or event hundreds to one. That ejected matter doesn’t just go away, but can itself, at least in theory, form dark matter-free galaxies. Where are we in our understanding of galaxies, dark matter, and gravitation?

It’s just a small piece of the puzzle, but this explains why not every galaxy has the same 5-to-1 ratio you might naively expect!

Ask Ethan: What Could Solve The Cosmic Controv…

Ask Ethan: What Could Solve The Cosmic Controversy Over The Expanding Universe?

“As you pointed out in several of your columns, the cosmic [distance] ladder and the study of CMBR gives incompatible values for the Hubble constant. What are the best explanations cosmologists have come with to reconcile them?”

If you had two independent ways to measure a property of the Universe, you’d really hope they agreed with one another. Well, the situation we have with the expanding Universe is extremely puzzling: we have about 10 ways to do it, and the answers all fall into two independent and mutually incompatible categories. Either you make the measurement of an early, relic signal that’s observable today, and you get a value of 67 km/s/Mpc, with an uncertainty of about 1%, or you measure a distant object whose emitted light comes directly to our eyes through the expanding Universe, and you get a value of 73 km/s/Mpc, with an uncertainty of about 2%. It’s looking increasingly unlikely that any one group is wrong, in which case, we absolutely require some new, exotic physics to explain it.

While many ideas abound, there are five of them that are eminently testable in the next decade or so. Here’s how we could solve the expanding Universe controversy in the best way possible: with more and better science!

No, The Universe Cannot Be A Billion Years You…

No, The Universe Cannot Be A Billion Years Younger Than We Think

“There may be some who contend we don’t know what the age of the Universe is, and that this conundrum over the expanding Universe could result in a Universe much younger than what we have today. But that would invalidate a large amount of robust data we already have and accept; a far more likely resolution is that the dark matter and dark energy densities are different than we previously suspected.

Something interesting is surely going on with the Universe to provide us with such a fantastic discrepancy. Why does the Universe seem to care which technique we use to measure the expansion rate? Is dark energy or some other cosmic property changing over time? Is there a new field or force? Does gravity behave differently on cosmic scales than expected? More and better data will help us find out, but a significantly younger Universe is unlikely to be the answer.”

There’s a fascinating conundrum facing modern cosmology today. If you measure the distant light from the Universe, from the cosmic microwave background or from how the large-scale structure within it has evolved, you can get a value for the expansion rate of the Universe: 67 km/s/Mpc. On the other hand, you can also get a measurement for that rate from measuring individual objects through a technique known as the cosmic distance ladder, and you get a value of 73 km/s/Mpc. These two values differ by 9%, and are inconsistent with one another. Recently, one of the groups studying this puzzle claimed that the Universe might be 9% younger than currently expected: 12.5 billion years old instead of 13.8 billion years old.

That is almost certainly wrong, as it would conflict with extremely important pieces of astronomical data. This really is a puzzle, but a younger Universe isn’t the solution. Here’s why.

How Did This Black Hole Get So Big So Fast?

How Did This Black Hole Get So Big So Fast?

“Recently, a new black hole, J1342+0928, was discovered to originate from 13.1 billion years ago: when the Universe was 690 million years old, just 5% of its current age. It has a mass of 800 million Suns, an exceedingly high figure for such early times. Even if black holes formed from the very first stars, they’d have to accrete matter and grow at the maximum rate possible — the Eddington limit — to reach this size so rapidly. Fortunately, other methods may also grow a supermassive black hole.”

One of the puzzles of how our Universe grew up is how the supermassive black holes we find at the centers of galaxies got so big so fast. We’ve got multiple black holes that come from when the Universe was less than 10% of its current age that are already many hundreds of millions, if not billions, of solar masses in size. How did they get so big so fast? While many hypothesize exotic scenarios like our Universe being born with (primordial) black holes, there is no evidence for such an extraordinary leap. Could conventional astrophysics, and the realistic conditions of our early Universe, actually lead to black holes so massive so early on?

The answer is very likely yes. Come see an extremely favored scenario, with nothing more than conventional astrophysics, that just might get us there.

Ask Ethan: What’s The Real Story Behind …

Ask Ethan: What’s The Real Story Behind This Dark Matter-Free Galaxy?

“I read a study that said the mystery of a galaxy with no dark matter has been solved. But I thought that this anomalous galaxy was previously touted as evidence FOR dark matter? What’s really going on here, Ethan?”

Imagine you looked at the Universe, and saw a galaxy unlike any other. Whereas every other galaxy we’ve ever looked at exhibited a large discrepancy between the amount of matter that’s present in stars and the total amount of gravitational mass we’d infer, this new galaxy appears to have no dark matter at all. What would you do? If you’re being a responsible scientist, you’d try to knock down this galaxy by any scrupulous means possible. You’d wonder if you had mis-estimated one of its properties. You’d try to re-confirm the measurements with different instruments and techniques. And you’d wonder if there weren’t an alternative explanation for what we were seeing.

Well, if you read that the galaxy has dark matter after all, and the mystery has been resolved, you should definitely read this instead. The story is far from over, and even if the new team’s results hold up, there’s still a mystery at play here.

Did Time Have A Beginning?

Did Time Have A Beginning?

“Even though we can trace our cosmic history all the way back to the earliest stages of the hot Big Bang, that isn’t enough to answer the question of how (or if) time began. Going even earlier, to the end-stages of cosmic inflation, we can learn how the Big Bang was set up and began, but we have no observable information about what occurred prior to that. The final fraction-of-a-second of inflation is where our knowledge ends.

Thousands of years after we laid out the three major possibilities for how time began — as having always existed, as having begun a finite duration ago in the past, or as being a cyclical entity — we are no closer to a definitive answer. Whether time is finite, infinite, or cyclical is not a question that we have enough information within our observable Universe to answer. Unless we figure out a new way to gain information about this deep, existential question, the answer may forever be beyond the limits of what is knowable.”

If you didn’t know anything about the Universe, you might intuit three possibilities for how time originated. Either it had a beginning a finite duration ago, or it existed for an eternity into the past, or it is cyclical in nature, with no beginning, end, or true delineation between past and future. But we have lots of physical evidence today. We know about the Big Bang and what its limits are. We know about cosmic inflation, which preceded and set up the Big Bang. And we know about dark energy, which determines the fate of our Universe.

With everything we know, what can we say about whether time had a beginning or not? Not enough, unfortunately, but the possibilities remain tantalizing. Find out what we do and don’t know today!