Category: dark energy

This Is Why Dark Energy Is The Biggest Unsolved Problem In The Universe

“The true fact of the matter is that, observationally, dark energy is behaving as though it’s a form of energy inherent to the fabric of space itself. WFIRST, NASA’s flagship astrophysics mission of the 2020s (after James Webb), should allow us to reduce the measured constraints on w down to the 1-or-2% level. If it still looks indistinguishable from a cosmological constant (with w = -1) then, we’ll have no choice but to reckon with the quantum vacuum itself.

Why does empty space have the properties that it does? Why is the zero-point energy of the fabric of the Universe a positive, non-zero value? And why does dark energy have the behavior we observe it to have, rather than any other?

There are an infinite number of models we can cook up to describe what we see, but the simplest model — of a non-zero cosmological constant — requires no additions or modifications to match the data. Until we make progress on understanding the quantum vacuum itself, dark energy will remain the biggest unsolved puzzle in all of modern theoretical physics.”

Since 1998, astronomers have known that the Universe isn’t just expanding, but that the more distant a galaxy gets from us, the faster it appears to recede away from us. The reason for this isn’t because of motion, but rather because there’s more than just matter and radiation in the Universe; there’s also a form of energy that appears to be inherent to space itself: dark energy.

While it may be theoretically fashionable to concoct new fields, modifications to gravity, or other forms of new physics, it’s unnecessary. What we really need to do is understand the quantum vacuum, and we don’t. Here’s the story so far.

This Is Why Einstein’s Greatest Blunder Really Was A Tremendous Mistake

“But there’s no retconning history; Einstein wasn’t right after all. While our Universe might actually have a non-zero cosmological constant, it isn’t there to stabilize our Universe. Rather, our Universe isn’t stable at all; it’s expanding from an initially hot, dense, and uniform state into the cold, sparse, and galaxy-rich cosmos we see today.

Einstein missed all of that because he insisted on a static Universe, and invented the cosmological constant to achieve that goal. Take it away, and you get a Universe that’s very much like the one we have today. The cosmological constant that affects our Universe serves to break the balance between the expansion and the other forms of matter-and-energy; it causes distant galaxies to accelerate away from us, pushing the Universe apart. Had Einstein predicted that, it would have been mind-boggling. Instead, he forced the equations to fit his (incorrect) assumptions, and missed the expanding Universe.”

When Einstein first set forth his General theory of Relativity, it included a term that no one had ever heard of before: a cosmological constant. Einstein had realized that a static Universe, the one he thought he lived in, was unstable. Gravitation would cause matter to collapse, and so something had to counteract that. His solution was to concoct a cosmological constant, something that he called his “greatest blunder” after the expanding Universe was confirmed.

Does the late-1990s discovery of dark energy, which might be a cosmological constant after all, mean that Einstein was actually right? Not at all. Come find out why today.

The Expanding Universe Puzzle Just Got Worse, As Incompatible Answers Point To New Physics

“Could there be a problem with our local density relative to the overall cosmic density? Could dark energy change over time? Could neutrinos have an additional coupling we don’t know about? Could the cosmic acoustic scale be different than the CMB data indicates? Unless some new, unexpected source of error is uncovered, these will be the questions that drive our understanding of the Universe’s expansion forward. It’s time to look beyond the mundane and seriously consider the more fantastic possibilities. At last, the data is strong enough to compel us.”

You’ve heard this before, commonly referred to as the “tension” in the expansion rate of the Universe. Two sets of groups are obtaining different values for how fast the Universe is expanding, and the value they get is either close to 67 km/s/Mpc (if you use an early Universe signal) or 73 km/s/Mpc (if you use a late Universe signal). A new result published this week in Science bolsters this, but a reanalysis of the one late Universe signal with a low value (of 69.8 km/s/Mpc) is the biggest deal, as improved calibrations bump that number up by ~4%, enough to put it in line with the other late Universe signals.

If neither the early nor the late group has made a mistake, the true answer is unlikely to lie in the middle. This is why, and here’s what, as a field, astrophysicists need to do about it.

We Have Already Entered The Sixth And Final Era Of Our Universe

“In the end, only black dwarf stars and isolated masses to small to ignite nuclear fusion will remain, sparsely populated and disconnected from one another in this empty, ever-expanding cosmos. These final-state corpses will exist even googols of years onward, continuing to persist as dark energy remains the dominant factor in our Universe.

This last era, of dark energy domination, has already begun. Dark energy became important for the Universe’s expansion 6 billion years ago, and began dominating the Universe’s energy content around the time our Sun and Solar System were being born. The Universe may have six unique stages, but for the entirety of Earth’s history, we’ve already been in the final one. Take a good look at the Universe around us. It will never be this rich — or this easy to access — ever again.”

There are a whole slew of events and stages that the Universe has passed through over its cosmic history, and plenty of more to come as the future continues to unfold. But as far as eras of the Universe go, where things make hard transitions from one epoch to another, all of our cosmic history can be divided into six of them. From inflation to the primordial soup of the hot Big Bang to the plasma-rich early Universe to the cosmic dark ages to the stellar age to the dark energy era, our entire natural history fits nicely within these boxes.

The only existential problem? The entirety of Earth’s existence has occurred in this sixth and final era. We’re already in the end stages; see how far we’ve come and learn how far we’ll go!

Ask Ethan: Can We Really Get A Universe From Nothing?

“One concept bothers me. Perhaps you can help. I see it in used many places, but never really explained. “A universe from Nothing” and the concept of negative gravity. As I learned my Newtonian physics, you could put the zero point of the gravitational potential anywhere, only differences mattered. However Newtonian physics never deals with situations where matter is created… Can you help solidify this for me, preferably on [a] conceptual level, maybe with a little calculation detail?” 

You’ve very likely heard two counterintuitive things about the Universe before. One of them is that the Universe arose from nothing, and this defies our intuition about how it’s impossible to get something from nothing. The second is that we have four fundamental forces in the Universe: gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. So how, then, do we account for the fact that the Universe’s expansion is accelerating? Isn’t this clearly evidence for a fifth force, one with negative gravity?

Guess what? These two counterintuitive aspects of reality are related. If you understand them both, you’re one step closer to making sense of the Universe.

How Can We Still See The Disappearing Universe?

“In fact, we can even think about what you’d see if you were to look at a galaxy whose light hasn’t arrived at our eyes yet. The most distant object we can see, 13.8 billion years after the Big Bang, is presently 46 billion light-years away from us. But any object that’s presently within 61 billion light-years of us will someday have that light eventually reach us.

That light was already emitted, and is already on its way to us. In fact, that light is already most of the way there; it’s closer than the 15 billion light-year limit of what we could possibly reach if we left for it at the speed of light. Even though the Universe is expanding, and even though the expansion is accelerating, that journeying light will someday arrive at our eyes, giving us, in the far future, the ability to see even more galaxies than we can today.”

Dark energy seems to present a paradox. On the one hand, galaxies are receding from us as the Universe expands, meaning we can never reach them once they’re beyond a certain point, and that the light being emitted by them can also no longer reach us. But even though these galaxies are a part of our dark energy-dominated Universe, we’ll always be able to see them in the future once they become visible to us.

If the Universe is disappearing, how can we still see the galaxies in it? Come get the answer to one of cosmology’s biggest (misconception-related) puzzles today!

Ask Ethan: If The Universe Ends In A Big Crunch, Will All Of Space Recollapse?

“When you describe the Big Crunch, you talk about a race between gravity and the expansion of space. It’s not clear to me that if gravity wins that race, whether space stops expanding, or simply that the matter in space stops expanding. I’d love to hear your explanation of this.”

The Universe is expanding, and we can confirm this by looking at the relationship between how redshifted a galaxy’s light is compared with how far away it is from us. But if these galaxies, at some point in the far future, stop being redshifted and start moving closer and closer to us again, does that necessarily mean that the fabric of space is contracting? Is all of space necessarily recollapsing? Or could the galaxies simply be moving towards us, owing to some massive attraction, while the fabric of space doesn’t recollapse at all? Does a Big Crunch necessarily equate to a recollapsing Universe?

Even though we don’t know whether dark energy will reverse itself or not, we do know the answer to this question, and yes, a Big Crunch does mean recollapse! Find out why on this edition of Ask Ethan.

What Was It Like When Dark Energy First Took Over The Universe?

“In reality, we can only make observations at one point in time: today, or when the light from all the distant objects throughout the Universe is finally reaching us. But we can imagine our hypothetical scenario just as well.

What would we see if we could track a single, individual galaxy — including both its distance and its redshift as seen from our perspective — throughout the history of the Universe?

The answer may be a little counterintuitive, but it’s tremendously illustrative and educational as far as shedding light on not only what dark energy is, but how it affects the expansion of the Universe.”

If you could put your finger down on a distant, individual galaxy far away and unbound from our own, what would you see if you could track its motion over time? For the first few billion years, it would be moving away very quickly, getting more and more distant, but it would appear to slow down. It would be as though gravity were trying to pull it back to us, albeit unsuccessfully. And then, at a critical moment some 7.8 billion years after the Big Bang, this slowing down would cease. The galaxy would transition from decelerating to accelerating, and would speed away from us, faster and faster, ever after.

This marks the transition to when dark energy took over the expanding Universe. Come find out what it was like when that happened, and how, today!

This Is Why We Aren’t Expanding, Even If The Universe Is

“As long as the Universe has the properties we measure it to have, this will remain the case forever. Dark energy may exist and cause the distant galaxies to accelerate away from us, but the effect of the expansion across a fixed distance will never increase. Only in the case of a cosmic “Big Rip” — which the evidence points away from, not towards — will this conclusion change.

The fabric of space itself may still be expanding everywhere, but it doesn’t have a measurable effect on every object. If some force binds you together strongly enough, the expanding Universe will have no effect on you. It’s only on the largest scales of all, where all the binding forces between objects are too weak to defeat the speedy Hubble rate, that expansion occurs at all. As physicist Richard Price once put it, “Your waistline may be spreading, but you can’t blame it on the expansion of the universe."”

On the largest cosmic scales, everywhere we look, we see things moving away from us. The distant galaxies are receding not only from our perspective, but from one another. The Universe is expanding, a scientific fact that’s now nearly 100 years old. But we ourselves aren’t. Atoms remain the same size, as do our bodies, as do the scales of planets, solar systems, stars, and individual galaxies. Even groups and clusters of galaxies don’t appear to expand.

Why is that? Why aren’t we expanding, even as the Universe itself expands? Come get the physical explanation of the most profound phenomenon in the Universe.

The Five Ways The Universe Might End

4.) Dark energy could transition into another form of energy, rejuvenating the Universe. If dark energy doesn’t decay, but instead remains constant or even strengthens, there’s another possibility that arises. This energy, inherent to the fabric of space today, may not remain in that form forever. Instead, it could get converted into matter-and-radiation, similar to what occurred when cosmic inflation ended and the hot Big Bang began.

If dark energy remains constant until that point, it will create a very, very cold and diffuse version of the hot Big Bang, where only neutrinos and photons can self-create. But if dark energy increases in strength, it could lead to an inflation-like state followed by a new, truly hot Big Bang once again. This is the most straightforward way to rejuvenate the Universe, and create a cyclic-like set of parameters, where the Universe gets another chance to behave like ours did.”

Based on the best knowledge and data that we have today, it’s clear that the Universe isn’t just expansion, but the expansion is accelerating. Does this determine the fate of our Universe unambiguously? If we extrapolate what the data indicates about dark energy into the future, we fully expect that structures (like our local group) that are gravitationally bound today will remain so into the future, but that larger-scale structures which are unbound (like our supercluster, Laniakea) will eventually dissociate. But extrapolation is tricky, and assumes that dark energy doesn’t change over time.

If we allow the possibility of change, though, many more possibilities arise. Here are the five most likely, and how we’ll distinguish between them!