Category: NASA

One Of These Four Missions Will Be Selected As…

One Of These Four Missions Will Be Selected As NASA’s Next Flagship For Astrophysics

“Choosing which of these missions to build and fly will, in many ways, inform our plans for the next 30 years (or more) of astronomy. NASA is the pre-eminent space agency in the world. This is where science, research, development, discovery, and innovation all come together. The spinoff technologies alone justify the investment, but that’s not why we do it. We are here to discover the Universe. We are here to learn all that we can about the cosmos and our place within it. We are here to find out what the Universe looks like and how it came to be the way it is today.

People will always argue over budgets — the penny-pinchers are always happy to propose something that’s faster, cheaper, and worse — but the reality is this: the budget for NASA Astrophysics as a whole is just $1.35 billion per year: less than 0.1% of the federal discretionary budget and less than 0.03% of the total federal budget. And still, for that tiny amount, NASA has steadily built a flagship program that’s the envy of the free world.”

Every 10 years, NASA performs a decadal survey, where it outlines its highest mission priorities for the next 10 years. The 2020 decadal is happening imminently, and once the recommendations are submitted to the National Resource Council at the National Academies of Science, the four flagship finalists will be ranked. This will determine NASA astrophysics’ direction for the 2030s.

James Webb is the flagship for the 2010s; WFIRST is it for the 2020s. What will we choose for the 2030s? It will be one of these four finalists! Dream big, everyone.

Trump’s Plan To Destroy NASA Science Lai…

Trump’s Plan To Destroy NASA Science Laid Bare In FY2020 Budget

“The most optimistic take on the President’s FY2020 proposal is this: there is bipartisan support for a United States with a strong science program across the board. WFIRST is the top priority space mission, as ranked by the National Academy of Sciences; NASA is doing what the scientific community has recommended to them as a whole by flying these flagship missions. Hubble, James Webb, and WFIRST are transformative observatories, and we can stop the President’s short-sighted recommendations from becoming law.

But the budget proposal also declares that as long as he is in office, this will likely be an annual fight. A single year of missed funding or underfunding can kill a project that took decades to plan and enact. We must not lose our will. Our future and present demands that we not lose sight of a record-breaking cut to the greatest human endeavor of all: the quest to understand our existence.”

Every 10 years, NASA sends its top proposals for an independent, decadal review, where recommendations are made to decide the future of science. The pinnacle of these recommendations are the flagship missions, like Hubble, James Webb, and WFIRST. Well, the FY2020 budget has just been proposed from the President, and guess what he wants to kill?

Did you guess “all flagship missions for astrophysics?” Well, it gets worse.

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Happy Valentine’s day!

Ask Ethan: What Will Our First Direct Image Of…

Ask Ethan: What Will Our First Direct Image Of An Earth-Like Exoplanet Look Like?

“[W]hat kind of resolution can we expect? [A] few pixels only or some features visible?”

I’ve got good news and bad news. With the next generation of space-based and ground-based telescopes on the way, we’ll finally be able to image Earth-sized and super-Earth-sized planets around the nearest stars to us directly. Unfortunately, even the largest of these telescopes won’t be able to resolve these planets beyond being a single pixel (with light leaking into the adjacent pixels) in angular size. But even with that limitation, we should be able to recover signatures of continents, oceans, icecaps, clouds, atmospheric contents, water, and potentially even life.

Come find out what we will (and won’t) be able to do with our first direct images of Earth-sized exoplanets, coming to you in just a few years!

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Incredible First Discoveries From NASA’s…

Incredible First Discoveries From NASA’s New Exoplanet-Hunting Spacecraft: TESS

“The ultimate goal of TESS is to find possible Earth-like worlds, and star systems which may house rocky, potentially habitable worlds. Because TESS is optimized to scour the stars nearest to us, it’s greatest finds will be among the first targets for future, more powerful observatories that can not only detect these worlds, but measure their atmospheric contents. If we get lucky, some of those worlds might house molecules like water, methane, carbon dioxide, or even oxygen in their atmospheres.

It won’t be a slam-dunk that these worlds are inhabited, but TESS takes us one step closer towards finding the nearest worlds that might be humanity’s greatest hope for finding life outside of our own Solar System. The worlds we’ve found so far are absolutely fascinating, and just a few months into its primary mission, TESS is easily meeting even the loftiest expectations for it. By time the James Webb Space Telescope launches, TESS should provide us with many worlds that just might be the best place to look to take our next great leap towards our ultimate goal: finding an inhabited world.”

NASA’s exoplanet-hunting satellite, TESS, was launched in April of 2018, began taking data in July, and released their first data to the world last month. That data contains around 300 candidate exoplanets, and the first eight of them have already been confirmed. From worlds so hot that they might have liquid rock on their surface to a solar system so strange we’ve never found anything like it, these are the first highlights.

Someday, TESS might lead us to our first world with signs of life on it. Here’s where we are so far.

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