Category: neutrinos

Has LIGO Just Detected The ‘Trifecta&rsq…

Has LIGO Just Detected The ‘Trifecta’ Signal That All Astronomers Have Been Hoping For?

“Of course, all of this is just preliminary at this point. The LIGO collaboration has yet to announce a definitive detection of any type, and the IceCube event may turn out to be either a foreground, unrelated neutrino or a spurious event entirely. No electromagnetic signal has been announced, and there might not be one at all. Science moves slowly and carefully, as it should, and all of what’s been written here is a best-case scenario for the optimistic hopefuls out there, not a slam-dunk by any means.

But if we keep watching the sky in these three fundamentally different ways, and keep increasing and improving the precision at which we do so, it’s only a matter of time before the right natural event gives us the signal every astronomer has been waiting for. Just a generation ago, multi-messenger astronomy was nothing but a dream. Today, it’s not just the future of astronomy, but the present as well. There’s no moment in science quite as exciting as being on the cusp of an unprecedented breakthrough.”

There haven’t been any official releases, announcements, or claimed discoveries, but many of you may be aware that back in April, LIGO turned on again and began searching the Universe for gravitational waves, this time with improved range and sensitivity. Over that time, some 24 candidate events have been seen, and the most recent one, from July 28, 2019, is perhaps something special. Located 2.9 billion light years away and likely to be a black hole-black hole merger, it just happens to coincide with the arrival of a cosmic neutrino, in both space and time, as seen by IceCube.

Electromagnetic follow-ups are currently underway, and this could mark the first threefold multi-messenger astronomy signal ever! Watch this one closely, as it could herald a new dawn for astronomy in human history!

How Much Of The Dark Matter Could Neutrinos Be…

How Much Of The Dark Matter Could Neutrinos Be?

“If we restrict ourselves to the Standard Model alone, we simply cannot account for the dark matter that must be present in our Universe. None of the particles we know of have the right behavior to explain all of the observations. We can imagine a Universe where neutrinos have relatively large amounts of mass, and that would result in a Universe with significant quantities of dark matter. The only problem is that dark matter would be hot, and lead to an observably different Universe than the one we see today.

Still, the neutrinos we know of do behave like dark matter, although it only makes up about 1% of the total dark matter out there. That’s not totally insignificant; it equals the mass of all the stars in our Universe! And most excitingly, if there truly is a sterile neutrino species out there, a series of upcoming experiments ought to reveal it over the next few years. Dark matter might be one of the greatest mysteries out there, but thanks to neutrinos, we have a chance at understanding it at least a little bit.”

Dark matter is a form of matter that gravitates, but neither absorbs nor emits light, and has been frustratingly difficult to pin down and directly detect. There’s a known particle that has exactly those same properties: the neutrino! You might wonder, then, if perhaps neutrinos had the right value of mass and number, if they could make up the dark matter? And if not all of it, could they at least make up part of it? This is a question that astronomers and physicists have pondered for decades, and we might be closer than ever to the actual answer.

How much of the dark matter can neutrinos actually be? Find out today!

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MicroBooNE experiment at Fermilab.

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MicroBooNE experiment at Fermilab.