Category: science

Ask Ethan: When Were Dark Matter And Dark Ener…

Ask Ethan: When Were Dark Matter And Dark Energy Created?

“Today [normal matter] is only 4.9% while Dark Matter and Dark Energy takes the rest. Where did they come from?”

The Universe, as we know it, got its start in earnest when the hot Big Bang began. Space was filled with all the particles and antiparticles of the Standard Model, up at tremendous energies, while the Universe then expanded, cooled, and gave rise to all we know. But when did dark matter and dark energy, which make up 95% of the Universe we know today, come into the picture? Was the Universe born with these components of energy? Or were they created at a later time? We have some inklings that dark matter was likely created in the extremely early stages, but may not have been present from the Universe’s birth. On the other hand, all theoretical signs point to dark energy always existing, but observationally, we have about 4 billion years where we cannot measure its presence at all.

Where do dark matter and dark energy come from? It’s a great cosmic mystery, but we do know something about it. Find out where we are today!

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Summer schools be like

Summer schools be like

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imsureiforgotsomething:

physicsforbunnies:

physicsforbunnies:

I’ve been thinking about this for days but… Chemistry really is just a branch of physics which has been historically separated from it because quantum mechanics and the finer detailes of atomic physics are relatively recent discoveries.

What i’m saying is that chemistry is clumsy physics. A vulgar version of physics. F*ck chemistry.

Guys… The second part of this post was obviously sarcastic. Did I really need to write this down. Fucking chill.

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Basically

Would you say that a physics major would have …

Would you say that a physics major would have a fair amount of job options available (or y’know, existent) after a Masters degree? Or do most physics jobs require a PhD? I want to major in physics by I’m not sure if I could really handle that much school, and I know Chemistry has a fair amount of job opportunities accessible with a Masters.

Hey, sorry for the late reply, my life is a mess. Also I read this after writing the previous stupid chemistry-dragging post. 

I think you can go after a fair amount of jobs after a Masters in physics. It depends

whether

you want to continue working in a strictly physics-related field or not. When I got a Masters I did a ton of job interviews and got hired in a major Bank to be a data analyst (even though I don’t know the first thing about finance),

but i then decided to pursue a PhD and never work in my life. Anyway as a physicist you can get really good big corp. jobs, and maybe – maybe – even end up working on some interesting projects such as: machine learning, robotics and AI, blockchain, etc. These big corporations really want physicists for these jobs not only because of our programming skills (they look mainly for Python, C, C++, SQL) but also for analysis skills and statistics, which a non-physicist programmer usually lacks. If you are interested in that kind of thing you can contact corporations such as IBM, KPMG, Deloitte, Accenture, Microsoft,Google, basically every bank etc. If being a manager/consultant isn’t your dream job, there are corporations that deal with research in physics, like STMicroelectronics, for example.

But if you want like a proper physics job like working in a lab for research and not selling your soul to capitalism for big money, then you almost certainly need a PhD. But I guess it depends what field you’re in.

As for chemistry, the best you can aspire to is to do product control for a factory, or spend your days in a hospital lab checking urine for diabetes and regretting not doin physics 😉

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I’ve been thinking about this for days but… Chemistry really is just a branch of physics which has been historically separated from it because quantum mechanics and the finer detailes of atomic physics are relatively recent discoveries.

What i’m saying is that chemistry is clumsy physics. A vulgar version of physics. F*ck chemistry.

What Is (And Isn’t) Scientific About The…

What Is (And Isn’t) Scientific About The Multiverse

“In this physical Universe, it’s important to observe all that we can, and to measure every bit of knowledge we can glean. Only from the full suite of data available can we hope to ever draw valid, scientific conclusions about the nature of our Universe. Some of those conclusions will have implications that we may not be able to measure: the existence of the multiverse arises from that. But when people then contend that they can draw conclusions about fundamental constants, the laws of physics, or the values of string vacua, they’re no longer doing science; they’re speculating. Wishful thinking is no substitute for data, experiments, or observables. Until we have those, be aware that the multiverse is a consequence of the best science we have available today, but it doesn’t make any scientific predictions we can put to the test.”

The multiverse is one of the most controversial topics in science today. On the one hand, it’s a remarkable story: perhaps our Universe, even beyond what we can observe, isn’t the only one out there. Perhaps there are many others, all generated in some early, pre-Big-Bang state, all disconnected from one another. This isn’t speculation; this part of it arises by combining the two well-established theories of cosmic inflation and quantum physics. Yet if we start trying to go further, such as making statements about the laws of physics, the values of fundamental constants, or the suitability of our Universe for life, we’ve lept out of the realm of science and into wild speculation or, worse, wishful thinking.

Come find out what is (and isn’t) scientific about the multiverse, and add a little bit of nuance to something you likely already have strong opinions on!

What Was It Like When The Universe Was Inflati…

What Was It Like When The Universe Was Inflating?

“In theory, what lies beyond the observable Universe will forever remain unobservable to us, but there are very likely large regions of space that are still inflating even today. Once your Universe begins inflating, it’s very difficult to get it to stop everywhere. For every location where it comes to an end, there’s a new, equal-or-larger-sized location getting created as the inflating regions continue to grow. Even though most regions will see inflation end after just a tiny fraction of a second, there’s enough new space getting created that inflation should be eternal to the future.”

You’ve no doubt heard that the overwhelming scientific consensus is that the observable Universe began with the hot Big Bang. What’s far less common, but just as overwhelmingly accepted and well-understood, is that a period of cosmological inflation occurred prior to the Big Bang in order to set it up. While most of us can visualize the expanding Universe fairly well, it’s much more difficult to get a good handle on what the Universe looked like during the epoch of cosmic inflation. Yet if you want to know where our Universe came from, and how it was born with the properties our hot Big Bang started off with, that’s exactly the challenge you have to meet.

Here’s an in-depth but scientifically accurate description of what the Universe was like when inflation occurred, and how it gives us the Universe we inhabit today!