Category: space

Regular

Wow 😂 (by @perryfellow on instagram)

Regular

Fun-o-fact #1

If two pieces of the same type of metal touch in space, they will bond and be permanently stuck together.

Celebrate Earth Day With The Greatest Images O…

Celebrate Earth Day With The Greatest Images Of Our Planet From Space

“Our constant monitoring irrefutably demonstrates human-caused terrestrial changes. And an unambiguously rotating, revolving planet. Still, venturing farther away reveals Earth’s cosmic insignificance. From interplanetary space, our details become blurred and fuzzy. […] But as we venture to the outer planets, we’re barely a speck. From the edge of the Solar System, we’re hardly visible at all. In all the Universe, only Earth is home to humanity.”

Today is April 22nd: Earth Day. This is the one day where we’re supposed to take the time to value and appreciate the only home we’ve ever known, and the only planet that we’re aware of capable of supporting life on it. It is small; it is fragile; it is precious. But it’s also beautiful beyond comparison, and perhaps the best way to appreciate it all is to view it from a perspective that most of us will never have for ourselves: from space.

Celebrate Earth Day in unique fashion by viewing some of the greatest images ever taken of our world from beyond it. And happy Earth Day to every one of you.

Celebrate Earth Day With The Greatest Images O…

Celebrate Earth Day With The Greatest Images Of Our Planet From Space

“Our constant monitoring irrefutably demonstrates human-caused terrestrial changes. And an unambiguously rotating, revolving planet. Still, venturing farther away reveals Earth’s cosmic insignificance. From interplanetary space, our details become blurred and fuzzy. […] But as we venture to the outer planets, we’re barely a speck. From the edge of the Solar System, we’re hardly visible at all. In all the Universe, only Earth is home to humanity.”

Today is April 22nd: Earth Day. This is the one day where we’re supposed to take the time to value and appreciate the only home we’ve ever known, and the only planet that we’re aware of capable of supporting life on it. It is small; it is fragile; it is precious. But it’s also beautiful beyond comparison, and perhaps the best way to appreciate it all is to view it from a perspective that most of us will never have for ourselves: from space.

Celebrate Earth Day in unique fashion by viewing some of the greatest images ever taken of our world from beyond it. And happy Earth Day to every one of you.

Regular

Regular

Regular

Earth: Hi sun!

Sun: …

Earth: …

Sun: Dad?

These Are The Top 10 Hubble Images Of 2018

These Are The Top 10 Hubble Images Of 2018

“Year after year since its 1990 launch, Hubble keeps revolutionizing our view of the Universe. No other observatory continues to teach us so much. 28 years on, it’s still yielding uniquely spectacular scientific sights.”

There were a slew of scientific, astronomical breakthroughs made this past year, and Hubble was at the forefront of a great many of them. There was a tremendous dust storm enveloping Mars, and Hubble was there to capture it. Saturn’s rings are evaporating so quickly that they’ll be gone in 100 million years, and Hubble captured them. Ultraviolet light is created in great abundance in the nearby Universe from star-forming galaxies, and Hubble completed a survey of them. Ultra-distant galaxies form stars too, and Hubble was there to image them and measure how far it truly is to them. Galaxies speed through clusters; clusters contain stars ripped out of galaxies; nebulae race to form stars before the gas gets blown away by the existing ones. Through it all, Hubble was there.

What do the top 10 images of 2018 look like, and what do they teach us about the Universe? It’s a year-end list to remember, along with a feast for your eyes!

Why Haven’t Scientists Found ‘Eart…

Why Haven’t Scientists Found ‘Earth 2.0’ Yet?

“Over the past 30 years, astronomers have gone from zero known extra-solar planets to thousands. Periodic changes in a star’s motion or regular brightness dips give them away. Thanks to these techniques, we’ve revealed the masses and radii of worlds nearby and thousands of light years away. Over 200 are Earth-sized, with many residing in the so-called habitable zone around their stars. Yet with everything we’ve found, there are no potentially habitable Earth-like worlds around Sun-like stars.”

One of the greatest success stories over the past 30 years is the giant leap forward we’ve taken in understanding what worlds lie beyond our Solar System. We’ve gone, in that time, from exactly zero known planets beyond our Solar System to thousands. We’ve found worlds far larger than Jupiter, some of which revolve at distances interior to even Mercury’s orbit. We’ve found planets around blue supergiants and red dwarfs. And we’ve discovered small worlds, some of which are even smaller than Earth. Some of them even occur in the so-called habitable zone of their stars.

Yet, despite all of this, we have yet to discover a single Earth-sized world at an Earth-like distance orbiting a Sun-like star. Here’s why we haven’t gotten there yet.

This Is How The Universe Makes Blue Stragglers…

This Is How The Universe Makes Blue Stragglers: The Stars That Shouldn’t Exist

“New stars form in large clusters, creating stars of all different masses simultaneously.
As they age, the more massive stars die first, leaving only the lower-mass ones behind.
We can date star clusters by examining which stars remain when we plot out stellar color vs. temperature. The older a cluster is, the redder, lower-mass, and less bright its surviving stars are. Globular star clusters are the oldest; some haven’t formed stars in ~13 billion years. Yet if we look closely inside these ancient relics from the young Universe, we’ll find a few blue stars.”

Okay, science fans, I’ve got a mystery for you. When you look at a star cluster, you’ll find a wide variety of stars inside: from the ultra-massive, hot, blue ones down to the lower-mass, cool, red ones. The older a cluster is, the redder it is, because the more massive, hotter, bluer ones burn through their fuel faster and die first. But as a cluster gets redder, we’ll inevitably find a few blue stars that don’t belong. These “blue straggler” stars behave as though they’ve formed at a later time than the rest of the cluster, even though we know that cannot be true. Yet they’re real, they’re there, and their lifetimes are often just 10% the known age of the cluster itself.

Think you can solve the mystery? Come read the story and see if you’ve got it right!